Scope

The DOTS project (Distributed Open Timed Systems), funded by the French National Agency for Research, is focused on the combinations of three aspects of concurrent systems:

  • timing and, more generally, quantitative requirements involved in real time or probabilistic systems,
  • interactions between open systems and their environment,
  • communications between components of distributed systems.

While these features are rather well understood when considered separately, there remain challenging issues in their combinations. The aim of the DOTS project was precisely to develop verification and control methods for such systems. The main techniques involved in this project are based on games and partial orders.

The purpose of this workshop is to gather researchers interested in modeling and analysis of concurrent systems featuring at least two of the above aspects. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Modeling formalisms like timed and/or probabilistic automata, timed and/or distributed games: semantic properties, verification methods and partial order based techniques,
  • Control or diagnosis problems with possible quantitative requirements for such models: synthesis, robustness and implementability,
  • Security problems in this context: modelling of distributed and/or timed non interference or covert channels, verification and synthesis, with possible relations to information theory,
  • Case studies involving complex systems.

Current Workshop

International Workshop on Distributed Open Timed Systems (DOTS'10) is organized by the DOTS project.

Scope

GASICS is an ESF project of the EUROCORES programme LogICCC (Modelling intelligent interaction – Logic in the Humanities, Social and Computational sciences ). It studies game theoretic formalizations of interactive computational systems and algorithms for their analysis and synthesis. Our aim is to extend the existing notions of games played on graphs introduced by computer scientists. Currently, most of the games played on graphs are of the sort "two-player zero-sum", we aim to extend them to "multiple-player non-zero-sum", and show the applicability of the new theory to the analysis and synthesis of interactive computational systems.

The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers working on game-related subjects, and to discuss on various aspects of game theory in the fields where it is applied. The workshop will be composed of two invited talks, together with contributed talks on the following (non-exhaustive) list of relevant topics:

  • Adapted notions of games for synthesis of complex interactive computational systems
  • Games played on complex and infinite graphs
  • Games with quantitative objectives
  • Game with incomplete information and over dynamic structures
  • Heuristics for efficient game solving.

Current Workshop

The 2nd Workshop on Games for Design, Verification and Synthesis is collocated with CONCUR '10 and will be held at Paris (France), September 4, 2010. Invited Speakers are Krishnendu Chatterjee and Antonín Kučera.

Past Workshops

Scope

A number of hot research topics are currently sharing the common problem of combining concurrent, distributed, mobile and heterogenous components, trying to harness the intrinsic complexity of the resulting systems. These include coordination, peer-to-peer systems, grid computing, Web services, multi-agent systems, and component-based systems.

Coordination languages and software achitectures are recognised as fundamental approaches to tackle this issue, improving software productivity, enhancing maintainability, advocating modularity, promoting reusability, and leading to systems more tractable and more amenable to verification and global analysis.

The goal of the FOCLASA workshop is to put together researchers and practitioners of the aforementioned fields, to share and identify common problems, and to devise general solutions in the contexts of coordination languages and software architectures.

Current Workshop

The 9th international workshop on the Foundations of Coordination Languages and Software Architectures (FOCLASA '10) will be held as a satellite Workshop of CONCUR '10 at Paris (France), September 4, 2010. Invited Speaker is Maarten van Steen (Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands).

Past Workshops

Aim

FIT stands for Foundations of Interface Technologies. Component-based design is widely considered as a major approach to developing systems in a time and cost effective way. Central in this approach is the notion of an interface. Interfaces summarize the externally visible properties of a component and are seen as a key to achieving component interoperability and to predict global system behavior based on the component behavior. To capture the intricacy of complex software products, rich interfaces have been proposed. These interfaces do not only specify syntactic properties, such as the signatures of methods and operations, but also take into account behavioral and extra-functional properties, such as quality of service, security and dependability. Rich interfaces have been proposed for describing, e.g., the legal sequences of messages or method calls accepted by components, or the resource and timing constraints in embedded software. The development of a rigorous framework for the specification and analysis of rich interfaces is challenging. The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers who are interested in the formal underpinnings of interface technologies.

Current Workshop

The 3rd edition of Foundations of Interface Technologies (FIT'10) is associated with CONCUR '10.

Past Workshop

Scope and Topics

Emerging trends in concurrency theory require the definition of models and languages adequate for the design and management of new classes of applications, mainly to program either WANs (like Internet) or smaller networks of mobile and portable devices (which support applications based on a dynamically reconfigurable communication structure). Due to the openness of these systems, new critical aspects come into play, such as the need to deal with malicious components or with a hostile environment. Current research on network security issues (e.g. secrecy, authentication, etc.) usually focuses on opening cryptographic point-to-point tunnels. Therefore, the proposed solutions in this area are not always exploitable to support the end-to-end secure interaction between entities whose availability or location is not known beforehand.

The aim of the workshop is to cover the gap between the security and the concurrency communities. More precisely, the workshop promotes the exchange of ideas, trying to focus on common interests and stimulating discussions on central research questions. In particular, we look for papers dealing with security issues -- such as authentication, integrity, privacy, confidentiality, access control, denial of service, service availability, safety aspects, fault tolerance, trust, language-based security, probabilistic and information theoretic models -- in emerging fields like web services, mobile ad-hoc networks, agent-based infrastructures, peer-to-peer systems, context-aware computing, global/ubiquitous/pervasive computing.

Current Workshop

The 8th International Workshop on Security in Concurrency (SecCo'10) will be co-located with CONCUR '10 at Paris (France), August 30, 2010.

Past Workshops